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Thread: Some tips And Tricks:: For Study

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    Lightbulb Some tips And Tricks:: For Study

    IMPROVING YOUR MEMORY

    Forgetting is a natural process, with the greatest losses occurring within the first 24 hours of learning. After one day you will forget 46% of what you read, 79% after 14 days, and 81% after 28 days. Clearly, it is essential to review readings and lecture notes within one or two days of initial exposure, with brief additional reviews interspersed in later weeks.


    PAY ATTENTION AND INTEND TO REMEMBER

    Which are you more likely to remember, the name of a coworker or your boss? We remember when we decide to remember and when we have a reason/motivation.

    1. Eliminate distractions while reading/studying.

    2. Develop a strong motivation; think of a reason why you want to learn this.


    ANALYZE HOW TO REMEMBER EACH FACT & CONCEPT AS YOU ENCOUNTER IT

    1. Decide whether you will emphasize concepts, memory devices, visualization, or reciting.

    2. Relate new material to facts and concepts you already know.

    3. To memorize terminology, think about familiar parts of the words or study the Greek and Latin roots.


    INTERPRET/UNDERSTAND THE MATERIAL

    1. To improve your long-term memory and to perform better on complex test questions, focus on understanding the basic ideas rather than simply memorizing isolated facts.

    2. Explain concepts to family members and study partners.
    This "teaching" will help you deepen your own understanding.


    ORGANIZE THE MATERIAL

    1. As you listen to a lecture or read, use "advanced organizers" obtained by prior knowledge or scanning to organize the new information. Just as an office worker needs a filing system, you need a mental filing system if you hope to comprehend and retrieve what you have learned.

    2. During review, organize your notes by writing questions or headings in the left margin. Create study charts to summarize your notes or text.

    3. The human brain appears to be able to hold only seven chunks of information in immediate memory, so breaking up material into categories will help you remember.


    VISUALIZE THE MATERIAL


    Half of the brain thinks in words and the other half in pictures; use both parts of your brain.

    1. Study pictures, diagrams, and charts in your text and develop your own.

    2. Visualize information. For example, to remember the date of Lincoln's birth, visualize a log cabin with 1809 carved above the door.


    RECITE WHAT YOU'VE LEARNED


    Recite for these reasons: it increases your level of attention, it creates a stronger neural trace of memory by utilizing more senses, it provides immediate feedback for your studying and thereby increases your motivation. Researcher Arthur Gates found that regardless of the subject, the more time students spent reciting, the better they remembered.

    1. Recite as you read, as you review your class notes, and as you study.

    2. For material which you need to remember in some detail, reciting should take up 60%-80% of your study time (relative to reading).


    REVIEW SOON AND IN SMALL, FREQUENT "DOSES"

    While longer study sessions are effective for writing or for creative projects, most study is best done in short sessions with breaks (for example, study for 50 minutes and take a break for 10). Researcher A.M. Stone found that students who reviewed their lecture notes for just five minutes after class recalled one and a half times as much as students who didn't when tested six weeks later.

    1. Review your lecture notes immediately (that day or the next).

    2. As you walk to your next class, recall the main points of the lecture you just attended.


    USE MEMORY DEVICES SUCH AS ASSOCIATIONS AND MNEMONICS


    Mnemonics are most useful for memorizing terminology and lists of facts, rather than concepts. G.R. Miller conducted a study of mnemonic devices and found that students who used them raised their test scores (by 77% in one case).

    1. Use word mnemonics -- such as HOMES to remember the Great Lakes: Huron, Ontario, Michigan, Erie, Superior.

    2. Use sentence mnemonics -- such as "Kings play cards on fairly good soft velvet." to remember the biological classification system: kingdom, phylum, class, order, family, genus, species, variety.

    3. Use mnemonics for spelling and for keeping terminology straight: A principal is a pal; a principle is a rule. Cyanates, I ate (harmless chemicals); cyanide, I died (poisonous chemicals).

    4. To improve memory, add humor and an "off color" element to your memory device.

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    Lightbulb Improving Concentration

    IMPROVING CONCENTRATION

    How many of us have gotten to the end of three or four pages of "reading" only to discover that we have no idea what was on those pages? We have failed to concentrate! Below, we will explore ways to combat the four main causes of poor concentration: external distractions, internal distractions, fatigue, and lack of interest.

    REDUCE EXTERNAL DISTRACTIONS:
    1. Find a good place to work -- usually the library. While the library may seem almost too quiet at first, condition yourself to the quiet by starting with short periods of study there. Other good places to study might include: C.C.C. or C.I.U. study areas, empty classrooms, department study areas, etc. If you are a commuter student, stay on campus to work during the week and on weekends find a library near you home to work. Trying to study at home or in a dorm room almost invariably leads to endless distractions, thus prolonging your study time.

    2. Minimize visual distractions by studying away from windows and in a place where you will not see classmates walking by.

    3. Eliminate noise by studying in a quiet place, without vocal music. While you may have listened to music as you studied in high school, college work requires far greater concentration and part of your focus will be lost if you listen to music while studying.

    4. Use appropriate lighting that does not strain your eyes.


    DISCOURAGE INTERNAL DISTRACTIONS:

    1. Keep your calendar or "to do" list nearby as you study and record there any reminders to yourself or worries that may distract you while studying (ie. pick up dry cleaning, worry about financial aid). By writing these things down, you can clear your mind for studying.

    2. Use a concentration score sheet. Each time you find your mind wandering, make a check mark on the sheet. Within just a few study sessions you should find that you have far fewer check marks and far greater concentration.


    FIGHT FATIGUE:

    1. Take regular study breaks. Many students find that working for 50 minutes and then taking a 10-minute break is ideal, although this varies, depending on the student and subject matter.

    2. Find your "prime time." For many students, one hour of daytime study is equivalent to one and a half hours at night because their concentration level during the day is much greater.

    3. Get your sleep at night, and avoid daytime naps lasting more than ten minutes. Concentration dips both before and after a nap.


    BUILD A STRONG INTEREST:

    1. Think about why you want to learn about a given subject. Scan your textbook chapter and think of questions you want to find answers to -- before actually reading your text.

    2. Form study groups to make some of your study time more lively and interesting.

    3. If the course and/or reading material is too difficult, find a tutor or find an alternate textbook. Some students like to read a high school textbook (ask in the Curriculum Room of the Main Library) or a study guide/outline book (ask in the bookstore) before reading a really difficult textbook.

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    Lightbulb Time Management and Organization

    Time Management and Organization

    Mark Dombeck, Ph.D. and Jolyn Wells-Moran, Ph.D

    Many people are discouraged from trying to learn new knowledge or skills because of time issues. They already feel that their lives are too busy and they don't see how it is possible to fit more commitments into their already jammed schedules. Other people take an overly laid-back approach to new knowledge acquisition. They sign themselves up for classes and programs and then don't take those classes and programs seriously. They show up late for class, or study in a haphazard manner. They may procrastinate with regard to assignments. At the end of the semester (when the course is over) they wonder why their grades are so low!

    Both types of people described above might benefit from improving their time management and organization skills.

    The first type of people (who shy away from new challenges because they are "too busy") might actually be able to make the necessary time available if they participate in a values clarification session (so as to figure out whether new learning might be more important than other current commitments), and then (if it is more important to learn), a careful rearrangement of current commitments and responsibilities so as to move aside things that are less important and make room for learning. Normally scheduled events (like preparing dinner, or paying bills, or child care) might be able to be put off for a while, or given over to someone else in the family so as to make room for school a few nights per week, for example.

    The second type of people (who take an overly laid back approach to learning) might do much better in their chosen programs if they actually made school a priority, attended class on schedule and studied regularly (as our study skills section recommends). Many things can be accomplished in life when you prioritize them, and then take them seriously enough to see that they get done in a timely manner.

    Time management skills boil down to awareness, organization and commitment. You need to become aware of and record everything you're doing so that important things get done on time and nothing has a chance to sneak up on you. You also need to commit to keeping your schedule, and not wandering off when something more momentarily interesting occurs. Time management and organization skills are applicable to a wide range of life tasks you might decide to take on. They will benefit you broadly in what ever you might do.

    The awareness part of time management corresponds to self-monitoring methods from our section on habit change. In this case, what you need to self-monitor are your commitments and how much time you spend on them. Commitments are appointments, or things you have to do like errands, or attending a class. They are also the things you choose to do when you are avoiding your actual commitments (such as spending time hanging out with your friends). Some commitments are predictable and follow a formal schedule, while others are informal and occur more spontaneously. You have explicit commitments (like classes and times you need to pick your children up from day care) and also implicit commitments (like the time you'll need to put in studying for tests, or researching and preparing presentations). Make sure you schedule time for both commitment types!

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    Wow!! Thats great Dr.Kals.
    An exhaustive review on memorising stuff,Thanks.

    But how to memorise such a long article? just kidding.
    Dr.Superior.

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    Default temme plz

    hi im new to dis site
    plz plz temme hw to download stuffs
    waitin fr the reply
    dreamzzz

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    You still get a thanks for me despite no hidden content, because I think it's such a good article. I've often found studying difficult: Not the actual topics, and I do well because my memory works in a strange way. But I want to do better.

    Thank you for this one.

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    Lightbulb

    Quote Originally Posted by Romutkoshur View Post
    hi im new to dis site
    plz plz temme hw to download stuffs
    waitin fr the reply


    Click Here

  8. #8
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    Can nyone giv details abt usmle.

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    @Dinkar, there's an entire subsection devoted to USMLE under entrance tests and career zone...

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    Quote Originally Posted by dr.superior View Post
    Wow!! Thats great Dr.Kals.
    An exhaustive review on memorising stuff,Thanks.

    But how to memorise such a long article? just kidding.
    Lolz...

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