Results 1 to 2 of 2

Thread: Baby Colic and Gas Quiz

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Posts
    6,603
    Rep Power
    44

    Arrow Baby Colic and Gas Quiz

    Baby Colic and Gas Quiz



    Do you know how to help crying baby?

    Babies who often cry inconsolably may have:
    • Gas
    • Baby colic
    • Acid reflux
    • All of the above
    Baby colic may be caused by:
    • Bottle feeding
    • Constipation
    • Too much attention
    • None of the above
    Baby gas may be caused by:
    • Foods in mom's diet
    • A change in baby's diet
    • Air swallowed during crying or feeding
    • All of the above
    Baby colic almost always goes away by:
    • 3-4 months of age
    • 6-8 months of age
    • Baby's first year
    You may soothe a baby with colic by:
    • Changing your baby's diet
    • Holding your baby differently
    • Giving your baby a pacifier
    • All of the above
    You may help reduce gas in your baby by:
    • Burping baby every 2 to 3 ounces
    • Gently massaging baby's stomach in a clockwise position
    • Using collapsible bottle liners if bottle fed
    • All of the above
    Treatments that may relieve baby colic include:
    • Anti-gas or anti-reflux medication
    • Over-the-counter baby colic cures
    • Topical salves
    • All of the above
    It's time to call a doctor if:
    • Your baby stops gaining weight
    • Your baby has a temperature over 100.4F
    • You're so exhausted you fear you could hurt your child
    • All of the above


    =========================

    Answer / Explanations:



    Baby Colic and Gas Quiz

    [HIDE]
    Babies who often cry inconsolably may have:


    The correct answer is: All of the above

    If it seems your baby is crying constantly, call your pediatric provider. Your child might have an ear or urinary infection, reflux, fever, or another serious condition. However, if your child is healthy and well-fed, yet still cries inconsolably for hours at a time, that's the classic definition of baby colic, says Steven Parker, MD, associate professor of pediatrics at the Boston University School of Medicine. Adding to their discomfort, all that crying may mean your baby is swallowing air, giving them painful bouts of gas, too. While all of this can leave both you and your child completely frazzled, know that babies with colic are healthy — and that nothing you've done is to blame.
    Baby colic may be caused by:


    The correct answer is: Bottle feeding

    Experts still aren't sure what causes baby colic. What pediatricians and every parent with a colicky baby are sure about: Colic can make for one very fussy child. While scientific studies haven't offered up one common cause for colic, there may be several factors, including: gas, regurgitation (reflux), lactose intolerance, an immature digestive tract, increased hormone levels, or simply an intense temperament when newborn. Be sure to talk to your baby's pediatric provider for a correct diagnosis.

    Baby gas may be caused by:


    The correct answer is: All of the above

    Baby gas can have many causes, including your diet (if you're breastfeeding), your baby's diet, and by baby swallowing air as he or she feeds or cries. Some babies get gas from the dairy in mom's diet. But don't change your diet, or your baby's diet, without consulting with your pediatrician. Young babies will have a certain amount of gas regardless of diet; it's normal. Also, remember, gas does not cause colic. Colic is defined by its key symptom: frequent, inconsolable crying. That said, many things can cause your baby to cry, and the discomfort of gas is certainly one of those things.
    Baby colic almost always goes away by:


    Time is on your side: Baby colic doesn't last forever! That's great news for weary parents and inconsolable infants. Generally, colic goes away on its own when your baby is three or four months old. If your baby is still colicky after that time, talk with your pediatric provider, your baby probably has another condition, such as an infection, reflux (regurgitation of foods or gastric juices back into their esophagus or mouth), or some other issue.
    You may soothe a baby with colic by:


    The correct answer is: Giving your baby a pacifier

    Once you're sure you're dealing with baby colic, you might try changing your baby's formula, feeding schedule, or the nipple on the baby's bottle. Breast-feeding moms may want to avoid foods like caffeine or milk (talk to your doctor before removing dairy from your diet; you may need to replace some nutrients with supplements). Swaddling helps some infants, while massages, pacifiers, or warm baths help others. You can also hold your baby differently to reduce air intake when burping; try across your lap, or while walking. Tap into the resources offered by your pediatric provider and other parents — each may have helpful tips on comforting your baby.
    You may help reduce gas in your baby by:

    The correct answer is: Gently massaging baby's stomach in a clockwise position

    Unlike colic, you can often pin-point the causes of baby gas, and so find solutions. For example, a breastfeeding mother might try changing her diet, reducing dairy or gas-producing foods like onions, cabbage, and beans. (Talk to your doctor before removing foods from your diet; you may need to replace some nutrients with supplements.) Bottle-fed babies may be getting too much air as they feed, so curved bottles or bottles with collapsible disposable liners may help. Burping your baby every 2 to 3 ounces can also help. If you breastfeed, try burping your baby each time you switch breasts. Gently massaging your baby's tummy in a clockwise motion may also help your baby release gas.
    Medications that may relieve baby colic include:

    "Colic cures" are usually anything but. That's because there is no one cause for baby colic, so there is no one cure. Anti-gas medications may help some babies with excess gas, and if regurgitation is the problem, anti-reflux drugs might help others. Yet while parents often think a medication, diet modification, or other change has cured their child's colic, in the end colic usually just goes away on its own. Before considering any over-the-counter colic medications, talk to your child's pediatric provider.
    It's time to call a doctor if:


    The correct answer is: Your baby has a temperature over 100.4F

    Having a crying baby can be exhausting, intensely frustrating, and guilt-inducing. But you're not alone -- as many as one out of every four infants have colic. That's a lot of worn-out parents! So when you need help coping, reach out. You're sure to find someone who understands. If you discover your child isn't gaining weight, has a fever, or if colicky crying lasts longer than five months, talk to your child's pediatric provider. A health problem, such as reflux, may be to blame.
    [/HIDE]
    Last edited by trimurtulu; 03-09-2009 at 11:25 PM.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Age
    34
    Posts
    2
    Rep Power
    0

    Default

    thanksssssssssssssssss

Thread Information

Users Browsing this Thread

There are currently 1 users browsing this thread. (0 members and 1 guests)

Similar Threads

  1. Replies: 3
    Last Post: 04-24-2011, 12:37 PM
  2. E.N.T Quiz!!
    By Asrafee in forum MCQs
    Replies: 9
    Last Post: 10-04-2010, 06:40 AM
  3. ENT quiz
    By ravimys in forum Clinical Cases
    Replies: 13
    Last Post: 03-18-2008, 04:15 PM
  4. HIV Quiz
    By kats in forum Viva
    Replies: 10
    Last Post: 08-06-2007, 10:40 PM
  5. Quiz
    By ravimys in forum Pediatrics
    Replies: 8
    Last Post: 07-27-2007, 02:28 PM

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •