Page 1 of 4 123 ... LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 31

Thread: Flow charts

  1. #1
    bladder's Avatar
    bladder is offline MedicalGeek Resident
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Posts
    333
    Downloads
    0
    Uploads
    0
    Rep Power
    32

    Default Flow charts

    Hi everybody.
    Do you guys have some good flow charts?
    If so please post them here.
    I will start.

    LFT's flow chart


    Renal failure flow chart
    Last edited by bladder; 10-21-2007 at 10:33 PM.

  2. #2
    bladder's Avatar
    bladder is offline MedicalGeek Resident
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Posts
    333
    Downloads
    0
    Uploads
    0
    Rep Power
    32

    Default

    flow chart for evaluating acute abdominal pain in adults

    Last edited by bladder; 10-21-2007 at 10:34 PM.

  3. #3
    bladder's Avatar
    bladder is offline MedicalGeek Resident
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Posts
    333
    Downloads
    0
    Uploads
    0
    Rep Power
    32

    Default

    work-up of Syncope


  4. #4
    vitrag24's Avatar
    vitrag24 is offline MedicalGeek Dean
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Gujarat, India
    Age
    27
    Posts
    5,609
    Blog Entries
    1
    Downloads
    0
    Uploads
    0
    Rep Power
    10

    Red face Evaluation of PUO


  5. #5
    bladder's Avatar
    bladder is offline MedicalGeek Resident
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Posts
    333
    Downloads
    0
    Uploads
    0
    Rep Power
    32

    Default

    flow chart for hypernatremia




    Formula for fluid replacement therapy in hypernatremia

    Free water deficit
    Free water deficit = 0.6 x body weight (kg) x [(plasma sodium /140) - 1]

    - the free water deficit can be replaced rapidly in acute hypernatremia, which has developed over a few hours; however, it should be replaced slowly in chronic hypernatremia, which has developed over > 2 days (50% replacement in the first 24 hours, and complete replacement in 48 - 72 hours)

    - free water replacement therapy should also take into account the degree of ongoing water loss and/or the balance of sodium and water in the ongoing fluid loss => the treating physician may choose to measure the serum sodium every few hours during the first 12 - 24 hours to ensure that the serum sodium does not decrease faster than 0.5 - 1.0 mEq/L/hour if he is not comfortable using formula to calculate the free water deficit and the precise rate of fluid administration

    - maintenance fluid and electrolyte therapy to maintain urine output and replace insensible losses must also be given in addition to replacement of the free water deficit

    Alternative Formula for fluid replacement

    - the following approach has the advantage that it takes into account the effect of different concentrations of sodium and potassium in the infusate, and it allows one to re-calculate the fluid replacement rate whenever one changes the composition of the infusate solution

    The formula is used to determine the effect of one litre of any infusate on the serum sodium

    1) Formula for infusates containing sodium
    Change in serum sodium = (infusate sodium - serum sodium) divided by (total body water + 1)

    2) Formula for infusates containing sodium and potassium
    Change in serum sodium = [(infusate sodium + infusate potassium) - serum sodium] divided by [total body water + 1]

    Total body water = 0.6 x body weight (kg) for children and non-elderly adult males, 0.5 x body weight (kg) for non-elderly adult females and elderly males, 0.45 x body weight (kg) for elderly females

    Infusate 5% D/W -------- Infusate sodium 0 mmol/L
    Infusate 0.2% NaCl in 5% D/W -------- Infusate sodium 34 mmol/L
    Infusate 0.45% NaCl in H2O -------- Infusate sodium 77 mmol/L
    Infusate 0.9% NaCl in H2O -------- Infusate sodium 154 mmol/L

  6. #6
    bladder's Avatar
    bladder is offline MedicalGeek Resident
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Posts
    333
    Downloads
    0
    Uploads
    0
    Rep Power
    32

    Default

    Flow Chart for Shoulder Pain



    Extrinsic causes of shoulder pain

    Neurologic
    Cervical nerve root compression (C5, C6)
    Supraspinatus nerve compression
    Brachial plexus lesions
    Herpes zoster
    Spinal cord lesion
    Cervical spine disease

    Abdominal
    Hepatobiliary disease
    Diaphragmatic irritation (eg, splenic injury, ruptured ectopic pregnancy, perforated viscus)

    Cardiovascular
    Myocardial ischemia
    Axillary vein thrombosis
    Thoracic outlet syndrome

    Thoracic
    Upper lobe pneumonia
    Apical lung tumor
    Pulmonary embolus

  7. #7
    dr_kals is offline MedicalGeek Resident
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    India
    Posts
    1,056
    Downloads
    0
    Uploads
    0
    Rep Power
    0

    Lightbulb Hypertension Management


  8. #8
    dr_kals is offline MedicalGeek Resident
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    India
    Posts
    1,056
    Downloads
    0
    Uploads
    0
    Rep Power
    0

    Lightbulb Management of stable COPD


  9. #9
    dr_kals is offline MedicalGeek Resident
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    India
    Posts
    1,056
    Downloads
    0
    Uploads
    0
    Rep Power
    0

    Lightbulb Referral criteria for patients with dyspepsia



    Refer: Endoscopy

    Immediate (same day) specialist referral is indicated for patients presenting with dyspepsia and significant GI bleeding (e.g. vomiting large amounts of blood).

    Urgent (within two weeks) specialist referral or endoscopy is indicated for a patient of any age if they present with dyspepsia and any of the following:

    * chronic GI bleeding (e.g. vomiting small amounts of blood, blood in stools)
    * progressive dysphagia (difficulty swallowing)
    * progressive unintentional weight loss
    * persistent vomiting
    * iron deficiency anaemia
    * epigastric mass
    * suspicious barium meal result.

    Routine endoscopic investigation of patients of any age presenting with dyspepsia and without ALARM symptoms is not necessary. However, patients aged 55 years and over should be referred urgently (within two weeks) for endoscopy if dyspepsia symptoms are:

    * recent in onset rather than recurrent and
    * unexplained (e.g. new symptoms which cannot be explained by precipitants such as NSAIDs) and
    * persistent - continuing beyond a period that would normally be associated with self-limiting problems (e.g. up to four to six weeks, depending on the severity of signs and symptoms).
    Last edited by dr_kals; 11-06-2007 at 02:12 PM.

  10. #10
    dr_kals is offline MedicalGeek Resident
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    India
    Posts
    1,056
    Downloads
    0
    Uploads
    0
    Rep Power
    0

    Default

    Last edited by dr_kals; 11-12-2007 at 07:21 AM.

Page 1 of 4 123 ... LastLast

Thread Information

Users Browsing this Thread

There are currently 1 users browsing this thread. (0 members and 1 guests)

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •