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Thread: Electrotherapy not in use Why?

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    Default Electrotherapy not in use Why?

    I have searched this site and I am astonished that there are no references let alone therapies discussing Electrotherapy devices. The type of electrotherapy devices I am referring to are the ones that kill bugs. They have been around for over 100 years and yet mainstream medicine does not use them. There are two main types, contact devices and field devices. I have developed a coil machine and a tube machine as in my avatar. They can kill any bacteria or virus and most parasites using about 10 Watts of power. People should not be dying from bug based illnesses when these machines can kill the bugs. I have sucessfully used these machines to rid myself of Borrelia, Bartonella, E Coli, Staphylococcus and Streptococcus infections. I am currently trying to get rid of a worm infection as posted here.
    See bugs in your own eyes

    These devices will cure cancer that is caused by a virus by killing the virus. Please explain why Doctors seem to be ignoring the technology especially when it is easy to demonstrate by putting bacteria under a microscope and running a field device to see the bugs get destroyed.

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    Electrotherapy is the use of power as a therapy In medication, the phrase electrotherapy can apply to a wide range of therapies, such as the use of electric gadgets such as deeply mind boosters for nerve disease.
    **SPAM**

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    Osteopathy may help reduce chronic pain and stiffness after thoracic surgery. However, electrotherapy is not effective pain treatment in the aftermath of pancreatic surgery. These are the findings of a thesis from Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Sweden, that studied complementary and alternative therapies.

    Massage, acupuncture, healing, homeopathy: use of so-called complementary and alternative medicine is widespread in Sweden and the rest of the western world.

    Although still skeptical, surgical healthcare professionals also want to learn more about these methods. These are the findings of a thesis from Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg,.

    In two studies, clinical nurse specialist Kristofer Bjerså examined the understanding of healthcare professionals regarding complementary and alternative therapies in the context of surgical care at Sweden's seven university hospitals. The findings show that personnel consider it important to know about these methods, and that skepticism still exists alongside a desire to learn more.

    Kristofer Bjerså and his colleagues also studied two therapies for postoperative care. One study tested transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) as a complementary pain control method after pancreatic surgery.

    "This concerns major abdominal surgery that requires sophisticated pain control in the aftermath, but according to our study, TENS was not effective. In fact, the method posed an obstacle for patients and healthcare personnel, because patients had trouble getting in and out of bed freely due to the extra wires attached to their bodies."

    Another study tested osteopathic treatment to relieve pain, stiffness and respiratory limitations in patients who had undergone surgery of the oesophagus through thoracotomy (incision between the ribs). In the study, eight patients received 45 minutes of osteopathic treatment per week for 10 weeks.

    "People who have had thoracotomies typically experience long-term chronic pain in the chest. Our study suggests that osteopathic therapy after a thoracotomy may be effective, but more and larger studies are necessary before any recommendations can be made," says Kristofer Bjerså.

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    The electrotherapy have many disadvantages because the electric current is directly apply to the muscle or tissues of a body & if it performed incorrectly, as the amount of alternating current used can damage the skin and cause other negative health effects. And it also can not be used on over the cancerous tissue, infected tissue, sensitive areas, on the chest of patients with pacemakers, the back of pregnant women, metal pins & plates, etc.

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