Results 1 to 1 of 1

Thread: Ahealthy 24 year-old woman was tested during her first pregnancy

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Posts
    6,603
    Rep Power
    46

    Arrow Ahealthy 24 year-old woman was tested during her first pregnancy

    Case Report:

    A healthy 24 year-old woman was tested
    during her first pregnancy and found to be HIV positive. A second,
    confirmatory test also was positive. She did not take nevirapine at the
    onset of labour and her newborn baby was not given nevirapine within
    three days after birth.

    Today the woman brings her two-month-old baby to clinic to learn
    if he too is infected with HIV. The baby appears healthy and weighs
    3.5 kilograms.
    ***



    Is this baby infected with HIV?

    How do you know?

    How can one prevent infection of HIV from mother to baby?
    COMMENT/ Explanation:


    [HIDE]
    COMMENT: Any baby born to a sero-positive mother also will be
    sero-positive for the first 12 months of life. Some babies still are seropositive for
    as long as 18 months after birth. For this reason, it is useless to test this baby at
    two months because he will always be seropositive.

    HIV rapid tests detect only HIV anti-body. The anti-bodies from
    the mother pass the placenta to the baby and thus the baby will test
    sero-positive until the mother's anti-bodies fade away sometime in the
    first 18 months of life. For this reason, do not test the baby with an
    HIV rapid test until the baby is 18 months of age. By that time, if the
    baby truly is infected with HIV, it will be his own anti-bodies giving
    a positive test result.

    If it is important to know soon if the baby truly is infected with
    HIV, then a PCR test can be requested within the first week of the
    baby's life. This test is expensive and usually is not done in resourcepoor
    settings if the baby appears healthy.

    Remember, only about 30 % of babies of HIV-infected mothers are
    infected with the mother's HIV. Most (70%) babies are not infected.
    This 30% figure is reduced to 12-15% by giving Nevirapine to both
    the mother during labor and within 48 hours of birth to the baby. If
    AZT is used from week 28 of pregnancy, transmission to the baby can
    be reduced to below 10%. If full dose HAART is used from week 24
    until the end of breast feeding (or 6 months), transmission rates can be
    reduced to as low to as low as 1%.

    There is now good evidence that supports giving all newborns of
    HIV + mothers prophylactic cotrimoxazole, beginning at six weeks of
    life and continuing for eighteen months. Prophylactic cotrimoxazole
    is protective of the pneumonias common to HIV-infected babies. If
    the baby is not HIV-infected, then cotrimoxazole usually does no
    harm.

    [/HIDE]
    Last edited by trimurtulu; 01-16-2009 at 09:51 AM.

Thread Information

Users Browsing this Thread

There are currently 1 users browsing this thread. (0 members and 1 guests)

Similar Threads

  1. Replies: 0
    Last Post: 01-21-2009, 07:04 AM
  2. 34-year-old woman with watery diarrhea
    By Amal in forum Clinical Cases
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 12-13-2008, 07:31 PM
  3. 18-year-old woman presents with right knee pain
    By Amal in forum Clinical Cases
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 12-08-2008, 10:04 PM
  4. A 37-Year-Old Woman with Palpitations and Near-Syncope
    By pintunoor in forum Clinical Cases
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 12-18-2007, 03:59 PM
  5. Replies: 14
    Last Post: 12-01-2007, 01:42 PM

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •